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Nutritional Perspective

Doctor: “Food has nothing to do with your disease.”

Your internal voice: “That can’t be right. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure, and many other problems are caused by junk food.”

Lesson: Listen to your internal voice. Your doctor most likely has no nutritional training, and therefore has no platform to make such an obviously flawed statement.

With thanks to Dr. Peter Osborne, an excellent functional medicine doctor (one who seeks the cause of problems) based near Houston, Texas.

Dr. Bogs is a Finalist in a World-Wide Contest–Please Vote!

Aloha Friends! I (and my garden) was selected as a finalist in a world-wide contest I entered online. Please vote for me so I can win!

My project was to grow and consume a lot of my own “Beyond Organic, Nutrition-Grown” food, which I wrote about daily on the contest website from January through April.

I have a good chance to win my division (the Health division) because there are only 4 other contestants. (There were 47,000 at the beginning of the contest.) The top prize is $15,000!

To vote, you can log on with your Facebook account by hitting the Facebook tab at http://www.transformationcontest.com/voting.aspx

If you don’t have a Facebook account, you can go to http://www.transformationcontest.com, register, and then vote.

You don’t have to buy anything, but you have to be registered one way or another to vote—that makes the voting fair because it prevents people from voting more than once. I heard that the Transformation Contest will be run again soon, so you might enjoy participating. It is fun and they offer nice newsletters about achieving your goals which you can opt out of at any time if you don’t like it.

Once you get to the main page, look near the top for “Vote now” or the “Voting” tab. Once you are on the voting page, click on “Health” and scroll down until you see “Vote for Jana”.

Thank you so much for helping me with this! I have a friend from the Kohala community, Maureen, who has already received $2500 and is a finalist in the Overall division. She would appreciate your vote too!

Please contact me if you have problems logging on. Voting ends Friday afternoon, May 31. Thanks again! Dr. Jana

What is needed to bring the Nutraceutical industry to the next level? What areas are seeing growth?

What is needed is something new…the nutraceutical industry, like many industries, relies on having new, different, better products—“new-traceuticals”! Consumers prefer herbal- and food-based products for their broad-spectrum of nutrients, especially if they are organically grown. Organic is more than well established, it’s hot! It’s not “going away”, but it’s not new either. So, what’s the next step? “Beyond Organic”!

Some successful companies are already using the term “Beyond Organic”, but what does it mean? Organic production is a system of growing foods which focuses on adding organic matter (carbonaceous materials) to the soil, while abstaining from manufactured chemicals. So “Beyond Organic” must mean something more. I use the term to refer to a method of food production which maximizes nutrient density by carefully analyzing the soil and then balancing it with the full spectrum of needed minerals. The plants resulting from this system test higher in nutrients. I call this process “Going Beyond Organic to Nutrient-Rich”. It’s all about helping the plants to express their genetic potentials, so that consumers can, in turn, express their genetic potentials. Look out for this next BIG wave in the nutraceutical industry!

Dr. Jana Bogs

Organic–it’s not just a label on good products–it’s a mission!

People in the organic industry are on a passionate mission to make the world a better place. It’s not a profession one enters just for the money–it’s about doing things right. Organic farmers feel good about what they grow, organic product companies feel good about what they produce, and consumers feel good about using these products. A lot of people are aware and concerned about the planet, so buying organic is helping them do something.

Besides feeling good emotionally, organic products help people feel good physically because they contain fewer toxic chemicals. That starts in the field with the farmer not having to “suit up” with a full body suit and a gas mask to spray toxic chemicals. Farming can be fun again! Scientific studies prove that children fed organic food have significantly fewer toxic chemicals in their blood. As cancer rates rise, consumers look for ways to decrease their personal toxic loads. The extra cost is absolutely justified, and the buying public votes “organic” with their dollars.

Other scientific studies show increased levels of antioxidants in organically-grown foods. Again, this appeals to the health conscious consumers. This quest for greater nutrient density is being answered by researchers such as myself who are moving “beyond (just) organic” to nutrient enhancement of food crops. This is accomplished through careful testing of soil and plants, and then supplying the plants with optimal nutrition so they can express their potentials. These nutrient-rich plants, in turn, supply us with outstanding quality food. Nutritionally-enhanced vegetables can have up to 10 times the mineral content of typical produce. This naturally-enhanced “beyond organic” food is the next big wave in the organic industry!

Article on “What’s Next for the Organic Industry”

What’s next for the organic industry in the US organic food and organic product areas? What are the challenges to future growth?      Posted on April 1, 2011 by zintro

In 2009, total US organic sales for food and non-food products were $26.6 billion and growing. With mass market retailers increasing their offerings of organics, where might the industry be headed?

The US organic products industry has seen strong growth over the years and should expect to see continued growth, says Peter Leighton, an expert and recognized leader in the areas of consumer products, nutraceuticals, and human nutrition. “In spite of weak economic conditions, the category remains vibrant,” he explains. “There are a host of drivers that fuel this growth, but the critical component is the acceleration of scale. As demand increases for organic products, more organic inputs are allocated, thereby reducing the endpoint costs for consumers.” This, in turn, fuels greater growth.

Environmental issues are increasingly playing a strong role in that growth, notes Leighton. “More data is demonstrating the value of sustainable agricultural practices and the health and environmental benefits of natural pesticides,” he says. While to date one of the greatest consumer triggers for organic products has been the health halo of the products, increasingly the industry will see environmental and ecological triggers driving consumer action, as these have a much more significant point of differentiation.

Carlos-AgNet, an expert in organic product lines and a consultant to organic companies and certification groups, says that the saving grace for the organics industry is a decade’s old demand that has seen supply increases. “This demand is providing unprecedented opportunity for those that can develop a retail organic product,” says Carlos-AgNet. “The industry has recently seen an explosion of beverages and beauty products.”

One of the challenges that Carlos-AgNet sees for the organics industry is the certification process. “Basic standards for organic certification receive a wide interpretation within the national standard and between countries, which inhibits trade in international products, such as food and textiles,” he says. New product areas in the organics industry bring with them a new generation of standards that are difficult for producers to sort out. Instead, cosmetic and food manufacturers are choosing voluntary or non-organic standards, such as natural, to avoid having to go through the national organic standards.

“The US market is decades behind Europe in organics and agriculture transformation,” says Carlos-AgNet. “A real threat to US producers could be the replacement of US producers of agricultural products with those from more advanced agricultural economies.” He states that this shift may not affect the US organic retail market.

Dr. Jana Bogs is looking beyond organics to the next step the industry might take to increase nutrition in organic fruits and vegetables and natural ingredients. Bogs is an expert in food science, horticulture, nutrition, and agriculture.

“Several scientific studies have shown significant decreases in nutrient density in fruits and vegetables over the past half century,” Bogs says. “There is a lot more research to be done, but we currently have enough knowledge to produce significantly higher quality produce at the current time. Some producers understand how to grow beyond-organic foods, but they need a better marketing system.” She adds that food and nutrition supplement companies who are looking to capture a larger percentage of the market would do well to look into these optimally-grown foods.

Hana Hou–Encore, Encore!–She’s Back—By Popular Demand

Dr. Jana Bogs, nutritionist/horticulturist, gave a well-attended presentation sponsored by Sustainable Kohala on “Gardening for Greater Nutrition” in February. From comments received, it was evident that the information was very much appreciated by attendees. Many people said they wanted to attend, but just couldn’t make it that night. Others, who would have liked to attend, heard about it after the fact. So, Artesia, in Hawi, is sponsoring Dr. Bogs to speak on the same topic again, Sunday, April 10 at 3pm.

This free presentation is all about “creating health from the soil up”. Come learn about how the way we grow food affects its nutrient content, flavor, shelf life, and even pest resistance!

See how growing in a “Beyond Organic” way can help plants express their genetic potentials, providing us with life-enhancing nutrients so we can express our genetic potentials.

Dr. Bogs will give a powerpoint presentation (approximately 1 ½ hours), followed by a question/answer session. This event is free and open to the public. Artesia, a beautiful setting, is located at 55-3584 Kaauhuhu Road (the transfer station road) in Hawi. When going mauka, Artesia is just before the transfer station, on the opposite (right) side of the road. Look for survey tape streamers on a tree out front. Contact Dr. Bogs at 938-9888 for more information.

Healthy Plants = Healthy Body

Dragonfly Ranch: Healing Arts Center hosts

Healthy Plants: Healthy Body

A presentation by Dr. Jana Bogs at 7pm
Preceded by a potluck at 5pm

Saturday, March 12th
“How do we get food back to its former state of glory, nutrition and deliciousness?” asks health educator, Jana Bogs, PhD.

A free Quest for the Best ™ — “not because it tastes better, but because it is better.” By growing organic, nutrient-rich produce, Bogs believes we can have not only high quality great tasting foods, but also the most nutritious and long-lasting foods.

The topic of “beyond organic” farming and sharing the benefits of healthy produce for our environment, our future, and ourselves will be followed by a discussion with questions and answers. Bogs’ goal is “to supply improved nutrition within a sustainable context, making a positive impact on the health of a multitude of people and animals.” She believes this requires “sparing the environment the consequences of toxic chemical production methods and giving plants the exact balance of nutrients they need to express their genetic potential.”

Bogs’ passion is to “create health from the soil up.” She has a PhD in Horticulture and Food Science/Safety and is exploring the cutting edge of what is possible in nutrition. To learn more about Dr. Bogs’ research and how you can be part of the solution, the public is invited to join her, free of charge, at the Dragonfly Ranch for her presentation.

Barbara Moore, soul proprietress of the Dragonfly Ranch: Healing Arts Center in Honaunau near the ancient Place of Sanctuary, says, “Dr. Jana Bogs is a gift to our community and it is an honor to host her talk.” Since 1974, Moore has crafted a modern day sanctuary for travelers looking for an authentic Hawaiian experience. Her award-winning treehouse-like B&B with indoor/outdoor lodging offers eco-spa pamperings in a lush jungle setting. Moore also grows an organic garden with food that she offers to her health-conscious guests.

“I welcome anyone interested in the subject of healthy food to join us for a healthy potluck meal at 5 pm so we can get acquainted and chat about our gardening experiences before Jana talks at 7,” says Moore. The Dragonfly is located 1 ½ miles down Highway 160, known as the City of Refuge Road. A map is available at www.dragonflyranch.com. Anyone with questions may call Barbara at 328-2159 or Jana at 938-9888.

“In the Sweetness of Friendship,
let there be Laughter
and the Sharing of Pleasures ”
Khalil Gibran
Barbara Ann Kenonilani Moore
President of Big Island Health and Wellness Alliance
soul proprietor of Dragonfly Ranch: HEALING ARTS CENTER
Voted #1 B&B in West Hawaii by readers of West Hawaii Today daily paper
(808)328-2159
http://dragonflyranch.com
where Aloha abounds
72 degrees and sunny on Big Island’s Kona Coast

The Future of Farming

Published in The Kohala Mountain News, Story and photo by Dr. Frederick Kennedy

Dr. Jana Bogs and Sustainable Kohala will host an evening presentation on February 13 to discuss a fundamental paradigm shift in farming and gardening–to a focus on growing more “nutrient rich” foods.

Bogs will describe the history which explains how the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables has suffered dramatic losses over the past 60 years due to the influence of big agribusiness. She will show how nutrient density can be regained.

Due to the ‘unsustainable’ practices of agribusiness farming, the nutritional value of fruits, vegetables is much lower than it was early last century. USDA documentation and several scientific studies prove this claim.

Nutrient testing of produce reveals that, in some cases, organic produce has a higher nutritional value. However, this is not a consistent finding, and, unfortunately, sometimes organics have lower nutrient levels than conventional. An apple can be perfect by organic standards (no bug or weed killers) and yet be significantly lower in nutritional value than a conventionally-grown apple. Soil mineral balance is a critical factor which is often overlooked.

Bogs explains, “In the 1970’s, as some people became aware of what big agribusiness was doing to our fundamental sources of nutrition, our fruits, vegetables and grains, the need arose to distinguish healthy food from plants that were grown expressly for profit margin. That need was filled by establishing standards and practices that would assure food buyers they were not getting pesticides, herbicides, chemicals (such as left-over bomb materials) and, later, genetically modified organisms in their food. It was a new movement and direction in farming and gardening, and it was called “organic.”

Today’s organic standards and practices tell the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, in order to earn the label “organically certified.” The standards and practices are ‘restrictive’ rather than ‘prescriptive.’

Bogs will explain how a new paradigm in gardening and farming is going “beyond organic” to “nutrient rich” standards and practices. This is a perspective that, while it meets and exceeds organic standards, it is prescriptive rather than merely restrictive. It looks to see what is needed to optimize the genetic potential of the plant. Rather than telling the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, it prescribes for them what they need to do to grow the very best quality food.

Bogs defines “best” for the consumer as the best tasting, the highest nutritional value, the most appealing and beautiful; for the merchant as the longest shelf-life and the most desirable product; for the grower as the highest yield, the lowest insect pressure and the most disease resistant; and for the environment as practices which ensure clean air, water and soil.

The February 13 presentation will take place at 7 p.m. at the Kohala Intergenerational Center (KIC) located behind the Hisaoka Gym in Kamehameha Park. The event is free and open to the public. Dr. Jana Bogs is a nutritionist, food scientist, and horticulturist.

The Real Food Campaign

Be a Part of It!!! We’re growing the BEST FOOD EVER!

Check out the following website–

http://realfoodcampaign.org