Zintro asked Dr. Bogs to Comment on The Future of Food Additives

The Future of Food Additives

October 28, 2013 by Leave a Comment

nutraceuticalsAccording to a new report from Packages Facts, a Rockville, MD-based market research publisher, consumers are driving a change in the reliance on synthetic and artificial ingredients in food products. “Food Additives: The U.S. Market” claims that more natural ingredients are going to replace the artificial ingredients that have been used consistently for over 50 years.

Research chemist John Mark Carter has concerns about the issues with stability and standardization when it comes to natural ingredients. “The trend toward more ‘natural’ ingredients is strong in the US and EU, where consumers can afford to choose more expensive products. But in addition to economics, there are two significant problems with these materials. One is their relatively low stability. Processed ingredients usually exhibit better shelf life, because impurities that accelerate spoilage are removed. The other problem is a lack of standardization. Naturally derived ingredients are usually variable mixtures of active ingredients with other materials. The active ingredients are rarely assayed and often poorly characterized.”

Dr. Jana Bogs, an independent researcher and consultant shares her perspective. “As consumers become more aware of nutrition in this information age, they want better quality products. Natural products are more ‘user friendly’ in the body than synthetics. Nature provides nutrients complexed in food form, the complexity of which is not able to be duplicated synthetically. One example is vitamin C from food sources which include a myriad of synergistic phytonutrients.”

She provides another example. “Consider the intake of calcium from food instead of from ground-up rocks. People were not meant to eat rocks. The calcium from rock sources, while ‘natural,’ is NOT natural as food for humans. This ‘rock source’ calcium ends up calcifying soft tissue–Aging!–instead of being utilized properly. Humans were meant to get calcium from foods. My work involves increasing calcium content (and other nutrients) in foods naturally through an enhanced growing process which starts with balancing soil nutrients.”

Aftan Romanczak, an expert in restaurant chain research and development, says, “The change to natural ingredients will always be dictated by supply and cost. Who will certify quality and supply? Not the FDA. Government regulatory budgets are stretched thin now and ineffective.”

Romanczak explains that changes depend largely on customer response. “How much are consumers willing to spend? The current products on the market are not cheap. The natural ingredient market will mimic the economy and increases or decreases in disposable dollars. Artificial ingredients will evolve into more effective synthetic compounds and the advances in nanotechnology will be the driver.”

Health foods and beverages marketing expert, Ninad Deshmukh, agrees, “The entire replacement of artificial ingredients in food products is not going to happen though I would be very glad to see such a day! The reasons include product cost, taste, and appearance- all continue to matter to the majority of the world’s population.”

What about the demands of health conscious customers in other countries? Deshmukh says, “Definitely people who are health conscious, care about earth and having money to afford will definitely drive the demand for natural ingredients. I have been involved with health food products manufacturing and marketing in India for the last 11 years and found that there is a niche market, though it’s growing. Price and taste still play a major role in choosing health food products for majority in India, where I am based.”

Color continues to be a critical factor in food appeal and marketability. The growth in color additives has been due to a transition from artificial colors to natural colors, with cost and formulation issues a critical area within the natural color additives market. However, consumer concern appears to be the fundamental factor in terms of the future of food additives.

New Book–Beyond Organic…Growing for Maximum Nutrition–Get your Free copy Now!

Jana Book Cover Revision 072713As a Thank You for your support (in many ways besides voting for me in the Transformation Contest), my gift to you is a copy of my new book–Beyond Organic…Growing for Maximum Nutrition. It’s on Amazon.com. Just click this link:
http://www.amazon.com/Organic-Growing-Maximum-Nutrition-ebook/dp/B00DYFHTN4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375296204&sr=1-1&keywords=beyond+organic+gardening+for+maximum+nutrition

(You have the option of reading my book on a Kindle device or on your computer with download of a free app available at Amazon.)

This free book offer is only available Sunday, August 4 through Tuesday, August 6, after that it is $9.99. Feel free to share it with friends. The more people who download my book and write favorable reviews, the more my book will go up in the ratings and be easily found.

Mahalo (Thank You) for your interest and support!

Jana D. Bogs, MS, PhD

Dr. Bogs and her Garden Win Second Place out of 47,000 Entrants

Transformation Contest Winner (1)Dr. Bogs entered a 90-Day Transformation Contest in January of this year. The main theme of her transformation entry was growing her Beyond Organic, Nutrition Grown vegetable garden and, of course, eating out of the garden daily. Dr. Bogs grew a great garden and blogged about it each day. She was chosen as one of five finalists in the health division of the contest. The final decisions were determined by online votes. In the end, Dr. Bogs came in second place in her division and was awarded $7,500. More important than the money, the win was a true honor given that the contest started with over 47,000 entrants.

2012 Sustainability Innovation Challenge Award Winner

Dr. Bogs won the agricultural division of the One-Island Sustainability Innovation Challenge for her Beyond Organic Growing System entry!

Here are the results from the One-Island website–

Beyond Organic Growing System ™ (BOGS™)

Entrant: Jana Bogs, PhD., Hawi

Prize: Inn at Kulaniapia retreat

The Beyond Organic Growing System ™ (BOGS™) is a new paradigm of farming which goes beyond traditional organic farming methods by focusing on improving the nutritional content of foods. Food from this system is termed “Nutrition-Farmed™”. Data from analyses of Nutrition-Farmed™ foods compared to USDA food nutrient composition tables show many-fold increases in vital nutrients such as calcium, iron, zinc and copper.

5 Hot Trends for Food

1. Rejuvenative foods—for the “Baby Boomer” feeling the aging process, as well as younger people who’ve perhaps indulged a bit too much in junk food and are now realizing why it was called “junk”. The stressful world in which we find ourselves spurs us to deep nourishment—just to keep up. So what are rejuvenative foods? “Superfoods” which pack lots of nutrients into a not-so-calorie-laden servings. Think kale chips—yummy superfood with a spicy coating, low-temperature dried to crunchy perfection.

2. Sustainable foods—the buzzword with a lot of meaning for conscious, thinking individuals. Organic, yes–even “Beyond Organic” foods, nutritionally-balanced from the soil up. No room here for nasty chemical sprays or genetic modifications brought to agriculture by Big Chemical corporations. Instead, our World is refreshed with wholesome, natural products.

3. Living foods—raw foods, as nature intended, with their full complement of live enzymes and nutrients undamaged by heat. These are powerful healing and energizing foods. Food scientists do their magic by combining these miraculous foods in tantalizing ways and packaging them so they stay vibrant until consumed.

4. Exotic foods—Consumers these days want more than just lunch, they want an adventure! Bring on the durian, the mangosteen, the abiu, the cherimoya. Never tried these? From lands far away come the king and queen of fruits, along with the princes and princesses.

5. Nutrition-Farmed foods—These foods have been carefully produced using a “Beyond Organic” Growing System™ which maximizes nutrient content, flavor, and shelf life. The growing system can enhance all four of the above categories. It all starts by balancing the full spectrum of soil nutrients so the plants can express their potentials. The lucky consumers are, in turn, supported in their own amazing potentials.

The Future of Farming

Published in The Kohala Mountain News, Story and photo by Dr. Frederick Kennedy

Dr. Jana Bogs and Sustainable Kohala will host an evening presentation on February 13 to discuss a fundamental paradigm shift in farming and gardening–to a focus on growing more “nutrient rich” foods.

Bogs will describe the history which explains how the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables has suffered dramatic losses over the past 60 years due to the influence of big agribusiness. She will show how nutrient density can be regained.

Due to the ‘unsustainable’ practices of agribusiness farming, the nutritional value of fruits, vegetables is much lower than it was early last century. USDA documentation and several scientific studies prove this claim.

Nutrient testing of produce reveals that, in some cases, organic produce has a higher nutritional value. However, this is not a consistent finding, and, unfortunately, sometimes organics have lower nutrient levels than conventional. An apple can be perfect by organic standards (no bug or weed killers) and yet be significantly lower in nutritional value than a conventionally-grown apple. Soil mineral balance is a critical factor which is often overlooked.

Bogs explains, “In the 1970’s, as some people became aware of what big agribusiness was doing to our fundamental sources of nutrition, our fruits, vegetables and grains, the need arose to distinguish healthy food from plants that were grown expressly for profit margin. That need was filled by establishing standards and practices that would assure food buyers they were not getting pesticides, herbicides, chemicals (such as left-over bomb materials) and, later, genetically modified organisms in their food. It was a new movement and direction in farming and gardening, and it was called “organic.”

Today’s organic standards and practices tell the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, in order to earn the label “organically certified.” The standards and practices are ‘restrictive’ rather than ‘prescriptive.’

Bogs will explain how a new paradigm in gardening and farming is going “beyond organic” to “nutrient rich” standards and practices. This is a perspective that, while it meets and exceeds organic standards, it is prescriptive rather than merely restrictive. It looks to see what is needed to optimize the genetic potential of the plant. Rather than telling the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, it prescribes for them what they need to do to grow the very best quality food.

Bogs defines “best” for the consumer as the best tasting, the highest nutritional value, the most appealing and beautiful; for the merchant as the longest shelf-life and the most desirable product; for the grower as the highest yield, the lowest insect pressure and the most disease resistant; and for the environment as practices which ensure clean air, water and soil.

The February 13 presentation will take place at 7 p.m. at the Kohala Intergenerational Center (KIC) located behind the Hisaoka Gym in Kamehameha Park. The event is free and open to the public. Dr. Jana Bogs is a nutritionist, food scientist, and horticulturist.

The Real Food Campaign

Be a Part of It!!! We’re growing the BEST FOOD EVER!

Check out the following website–

http://realfoodcampaign.org

GREAT Video explaining Nutrient-Rich(TM) Foods

Just click on the “Nutrient Dense” link below–

Nutrient Dense Foods for Consumers, Gardeners, and Farmers from Environmental Leadership Program on Vimeo.

Creating Success for Hawaii from the Soil Up!

Growing better quality, Nutrient-RichTM foods can make differences in the lives of producers, marketers, and consumers, as well as the environment. Scientific studies confirm significant declines in nutrient content of produce since 1940. Greater quality is achievable through sustainable production methods, utilizing soil and plant tissue testing for determining nutrient inputs. The aim is to give the plants everything they need to achieve their genetic potential and provide highly nourishing, nutrient-dense foods for humans and animals.

In addition to quality improvements, producers can realize greater crop production yields with soil balancing programs. Producers may also experience less pest and disease pressure without the use of expensive toxic “rescue” chemicals. Why is that? Healthier plants are more resistant to pests and diseases. Greater crop yields and fewer losses will, of course, equate to greater income. Furthermore, better tasting produce sells for premium prices.

Produce marketers can easily sell this great tasting, high brix produce, which has a long shelf life. Brix refers to the amount of naturally-occurring sugars in the plants. It has been observed that increased plant brix may be related to plant health, produce flavor and shelf life. The long shelf life equates to fewer storage losses and therefore higher profits.

Consumers delight in produce of unsurpassed quality in flavor, full-spectrum nutrition, and extended keeping qualities, while comforted by the fact that no harmful chemicals were used in production. Humans and animals need a broader range of nutrients than do plants for optimal health. Therefore, adding a few elements, like the typical N-P-K, may improve apparent plant health while falling short of producing well-rounded nutrition for consumers. Broad-spectrum plant nutrition may also help the plant to produce a wider range of flavor compounds which may result in award-winning produce.

Finally, with conscientious organic production systems the environment is spared the consequences of toxic chemical production methods—water contamination, soil degradation and erosion, air pollution. Instead, Our World is refreshed by wholesome products and thoughtful practices.

What can the growing of Nutrient-RichTM foods mean for Hawaii? We can improve food sustainability while improving the health of our people and caretaking the aina. We can set quality standards for the world while creating a clear marketing edge for our agricultural products. Nutrient-RichTM demonstration farms will educate all sectors of the populace, and encourage agri-tourism and eco-tourism.

For more information on Nutrient-RichTM food production, soil/plant testing and sustainable production practices contact:
Dr. Jana Bogs (located on the Big Island of Hawaii)

Vision for Sustainable Agriculture

The focus of my research is “Creating Health from the Soil Up”.

Sustainable agriculture encompasses many aspects of raising food, fiber and fuel products. We must care take our soils, water and air while monitoring impacts of methods of production on agricultural workers and consumers. Ideally, we as a global community should be able to produce high quality, abundant agricultural products which enable humans and animals to thrive from generation to generation without damaging our environment. I felt compelled to study the problems in detail in a university setting and build on the work of other researchers in discovering solutions. Research done with appropriate controls and approved methodology is important for broad acceptance.

My research focuses on bridging an understanding from soil health, through plant health to animal and human health. I have been encouraged by various professors and agriculture professionals around our country and the globe who are excited about my research of comparing sustainable organic/biological cultivation systems to conventional systems and testing the effects in humans. My aim is to highlight differences that production management systems have on produce quality, emphasizing nutritional differences and direct effects on human metabolism.

For example, field observations and pilot data suggest that human blood glucose responses differ between fruits of the same cultivar grown under these different methods. It is reported that diabetics can eat high quality, biologically-produced fruit without a large glycemic fluctuation, yet the same cultivar conventionally grown causes a spike in blood glucose. What makes these observations even more intriguing is that the biologically-produced fruits typically have a higher percentage of sugars than the conventional counterparts. In addition, the biologically-produced fruits are reported to taste better and have a much longer shelf life.

The implications of this research are vast. The underlying principles can be applied to any crop.

The roadmap to sustainability starts with soil health, which implies balanced, full-spectrum minerals, active microbial and earthworm populations, and high organic matter content. Some attributes of healthy soil are:

  • Healthy soil supports healthy plant growth. An ideal microbial population helps make nutrients available to the plants.
  • Microbes “glue” soil particles together which decreases erosion and toxic run-off, decreases needed inputs, decreases costs, and saves our top soil. The producers will have good land to pass on to their heirs.
  • Selected microbes trap nitrogen from air which decreases nitrogen inputs, decreases costs, and decreases pollution.
  • Microbial activity keeps the soil temperature more constant (warmer in winter, cooler in summer) which equates to longer growing seasons. More stable ground temperatures may also influence the stability of the air temperature over the land. This may equate to less extreme weather patterns, which would bring better farming and living conditions. Currently, due to extreme weather patterns, some producers are feeling forced to expend large sums of money for greenhouses to protect their crops.
  • Selected microbes clean up toxic conditions, such as “chemically-burned” fields.
  • Microbes and earthworms recycle nutrients in the soil and improve soil tilth.
  • Beneficial microbes and soil organic matter help modulate soil moisture content allowing crops to better withstand fluctuations in moisture.

Moving on to plant health—

Through superior farming practices and wise choices of cultivars, some producers have been able to produce abundant, award-winning crops without harmful chemicals. These truly healthy crops exhibit ideal tissue pH levels, soluble solids concentrations, and mineral balances, along with low nitrates, ammonia, free amino acids and reducing sugars. Fortunately, technology has provided producers with affordable, easy-to-use tools and tests for monitoring soil and plant health. When superior plant health is achieved, then:

  • Insects are less attracted to the plants, so fewer pesticides are needed. This equates to less expense, decreased crop losses, decreased environmental pollution (air, water, soil), and fewer health risks for agricultural workers. Pesticide-free produce may also bring premium prices.
  • Plants are more disease and pest resistant, so fewer sprays will be needed. Again, less expense, decreased crop losses, decreased pollution, and fewer health risks, along with possible premiums.
  • Plants may realize their genetic potential with increased yields (increased profits) and higher quality produce (which brings premiums for the producers, sometimes huge premiums).

Quality produce has:

  • High antioxidant and nutrient density which makes it healthful and satisfying.
  • An exceptionally long shelf life which decreases losses for producers, packers, shippers, and consumers.
  • Superior taste and sensory appeal, which increases consumer demand and, again, brings premium prices.
  • A proud producer who feels good about what he does for the world as he leans against his well-padded wallet. 😉

High quality feedstuffs for animals equate to:

  • Healthier, happier animals resulting in decreased need for medication and decreased losses.
  • Increased production and profits.
  • Healthier animal food products for consumers.

Consumer benefits:

  • Improved food flavor and satisfaction.
  • Better-tasting produce may increase consumption of fruits and vegetables, which may in turn equate to better health.
  • Decreased levels of harmful agricultural chemicals means decreased toxins in food and the environment.
  • Longer shelf life leading to decreased losses after purchasing foods.
  • Full-spectrum nutrition equates to better health. This decreases healthcare costs while increasing human productivity and quality of life.

I see this as a win-win-win-win situation—for producers, animals, human consumers, and the environment. Already, in several parts of the world, some producers are “nutrition farming” and contracting with grocery stores to market their superior products to grateful consumers.

Plans for the future include:

  • expansion of on-farm and university-associated research
  • labeling program for “Nutrient-Rich” foods that have met high standards of quality including nutrient content, sensory perception parameters, shelf-life values and freedom from toxic contaminants
  • establishment of a model farm for educational purposes
  • commercial production of nutrient-rich foods
  • marketing and distribution of these high quality foods
  • involvement with industry and governmental leaders in promoting nutrient-dense sustainable agriculture

My vision is that more educators will share vital crop-improvement information in an effective manner to many producers, who will in turn supply improved nutrition within a sustainable context, making a positive impact on the health of a multitude of people and animals.

For a Healthier World, Jana D. Bogs, PhD

For more information on soil/plant testing and sustainable production practices contact:

Dr. Jana Bogs (located on the Big Island of Hawaii)