Tropical Edibles Weekend Workshop

Dr. Bogs teaching at the Tropical Edibles Weekend Workshop

Tropical Edibles Nursery in Captain Cook, Hawaii, hosted Dr. Bogs to teach a weekend workshop on Soil: From the Ground Up. The event was sponsored by Hawaii Farm Bureau. The workshop covered the topic of soil nutrient deficiencies, the consequences of that, and how to correct the imbalances. Powerpoint presentations and hand-outs clarified the mysteries of soil analyses, while hands-on sections addressed plant tissue analysis and soil amending.

2012 Sustainability Innovation Challenge Award Winner

Dr. Bogs won the agricultural division of the One-Island Sustainability Innovation Challenge for her Beyond Organic Growing System entry!

Here are the results from the One-Island website–

Beyond Organic Growing System ™ (BOGS™)

Entrant: Jana Bogs, PhD., Hawi

Prize: Inn at Kulaniapia retreat

The Beyond Organic Growing System ™ (BOGS™) is a new paradigm of farming which goes beyond traditional organic farming methods by focusing on improving the nutritional content of foods. Food from this system is termed “Nutrition-Farmed™”. Data from analyses of Nutrition-Farmed™ foods compared to USDA food nutrient composition tables show many-fold increases in vital nutrients such as calcium, iron, zinc and copper.

Mangoes at the Moana–Dr. Bogs speaker and mango judge

The 4th Annual “Mangoes at the Moana” event was held on July 21, 2012 at the prestigious Moana Surfrider Hotel.  This is the oldest (and yet very grand) hotel on the world famous Waikiki Beach on the island of Oahu.  Dr. Bogs presented a powerpoint lecture on growing more nutritious foods and enjoyed the ono (delicious) job of judging the best mangoes.  There were over 30 mango entries from around the state of Hawaii.  Three judges tasted and re-tasted the fabulous mangoes.  It was not an easy job, but the decision finally came clear.  The winning entry hailed from the Kona side of the Big Island of Hawaii.

Mango judge, Dr. Bogs, “hard at work”

Dr. Bogs Invited to Speak in China

Feasts and interesting extra-curricular tours. One Chinese agricultural researcher was so impressed with Dr. Bogs’ powerpoint presentation that he requested a copy for use in advancing the ideas in his country. Dr. Bogs is continuing correspondence/collaboration with other agricultural experts she met there who hail from the USA, Canada, Spain and Germany. Indeed, her ideas have garnered international interest and attention.

Kohala High School Ag Program Grows Again

Written by Andrea Dean | 27 April 2012

Volunteers spent Earth Day reviving the grounds of the Kohala High School Ag Program (Dr. Bogs on right)

For 30 years Uncle David Fuertes was the agriculture teacher at Kohala High School. In its glory days the ag program made $25,000 per year by growing and selling its own products. The program emphasized entrepreneurship and leadership skills, as well as agricultural skills. They had a greenhouse, certified kitchen, four acres of vegetables and animal pastures. Many of Kohala’s leaders today were students who were mentored by David in the Hawai‘i Future Farmers of America (FFA) program—including High School principal Jeanette Snelling, and Adriel Robitaille, the new Ag teacher. After attending college it was Adriel’s dream to come back to Kohala and to revitalize the ag program. That dream is now becoming a reality.

On Earth Day, Saturday, April 21st— former Hawai‘i FFA graduates, All About Trees, Ka Hana No‘eau students, and volunteers from the North Kohala Eat Locally Grown Campaign came together with Uncle David to help Adriel with some major projects at the site.

Crews cleared out invasive African Tulip trees, pulled out stumps from otherwise usable land, cleaned out the greenhouse, moved piles of roofing, laid irrigation pipe and planted two breadfruit trees. Previously, much of the site was literary unearthed—Adriel and the students removed grass that had grown 4 feet tall off the floor of the greenhouse, pulled sinks and tables out of the bushes, and beat back the jungle from the classroom.

Rebuilding the program is a major project, but the Kohala Ag program is already hosting a new chicken coop (with chickens), a pasture with goats, a taro lo‘i and an aquaculture tank (fish coming soon…now that there is water!).

It has been a long wait, but the North Kohala High School Ag program has begun its renaissance, and district families and students are energized.


Andrea Dean, MBA, of Sustainable Initiatives works with communities, businesses and non-profits on initiatives that enhance island economy, environment and community. Andrea is also the Special Projects Coordinator for the Hawai’i Homegrown Food Network, and is co-coordinator of the Ho’oulu ka ‘Ulu – Revitalizing Breadfruit program.

1 Comment

  1. Kaleopono makes this comment

Tuesday, 01 May 2012

I am so glad to learn that the Kohala High Ag Program is being revitalized. Years ago as President of the Hawaii State Young Farmers Association, I collaborated with David Fuertes to recognize and honor students in the North Kohala Future Farmers of America program. When I quite a few years later lived for 10 years in North Kohala, I was dismayed by the absence of the ag (and other trades like woodworking and mechanical) program from the high school curriculum. Does this mean than more generous resources for practical, hands on education are flowing back into DOE? I hope so.

 

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Hana Hou–Encore, Encore!–She’s Back—By Popular Demand

Dr. Jana Bogs, nutritionist/horticulturist, gave a well-attended presentation sponsored by Sustainable Kohala on “Gardening for Greater Nutrition” in February. From comments received, it was evident that the information was very much appreciated by attendees. Many people said they wanted to attend, but just couldn’t make it that night. Others, who would have liked to attend, heard about it after the fact. So, Artesia, in Hawi, is sponsoring Dr. Bogs to speak on the same topic again, Sunday, April 10 at 3pm.

This free presentation is all about “creating health from the soil up”. Come learn about how the way we grow food affects its nutrient content, flavor, shelf life, and even pest resistance!

See how growing in a “Beyond Organic” way can help plants express their genetic potentials, providing us with life-enhancing nutrients so we can express our genetic potentials.

Dr. Bogs will give a powerpoint presentation (approximately 1 ½ hours), followed by a question/answer session. This event is free and open to the public. Artesia, a beautiful setting, is located at 55-3584 Kaauhuhu Road (the transfer station road) in Hawi. When going mauka, Artesia is just before the transfer station, on the opposite (right) side of the road. Look for survey tape streamers on a tree out front. Contact Dr. Bogs at 938-9888 for more information.

Healthy Plants = Healthy Body

Dragonfly Ranch: Healing Arts Center hosts

Healthy Plants: Healthy Body

A presentation by Dr. Jana Bogs at 7pm
Preceded by a potluck at 5pm

Saturday, March 12th
“How do we get food back to its former state of glory, nutrition and deliciousness?” asks health educator, Jana Bogs, PhD.

A free Quest for the Best ™ — “not because it tastes better, but because it is better.” By growing organic, nutrient-rich produce, Bogs believes we can have not only high quality great tasting foods, but also the most nutritious and long-lasting foods.

The topic of “beyond organic” farming and sharing the benefits of healthy produce for our environment, our future, and ourselves will be followed by a discussion with questions and answers. Bogs’ goal is “to supply improved nutrition within a sustainable context, making a positive impact on the health of a multitude of people and animals.” She believes this requires “sparing the environment the consequences of toxic chemical production methods and giving plants the exact balance of nutrients they need to express their genetic potential.”

Bogs’ passion is to “create health from the soil up.” She has a PhD in Horticulture and Food Science/Safety and is exploring the cutting edge of what is possible in nutrition. To learn more about Dr. Bogs’ research and how you can be part of the solution, the public is invited to join her, free of charge, at the Dragonfly Ranch for her presentation.

Barbara Moore, soul proprietress of the Dragonfly Ranch: Healing Arts Center in Honaunau near the ancient Place of Sanctuary, says, “Dr. Jana Bogs is a gift to our community and it is an honor to host her talk.” Since 1974, Moore has crafted a modern day sanctuary for travelers looking for an authentic Hawaiian experience. Her award-winning treehouse-like B&B with indoor/outdoor lodging offers eco-spa pamperings in a lush jungle setting. Moore also grows an organic garden with food that she offers to her health-conscious guests.

“I welcome anyone interested in the subject of healthy food to join us for a healthy potluck meal at 5 pm so we can get acquainted and chat about our gardening experiences before Jana talks at 7,” says Moore. The Dragonfly is located 1 ½ miles down Highway 160, known as the City of Refuge Road. A map is available at www.dragonflyranch.com. Anyone with questions may call Barbara at 328-2159 or Jana at 938-9888.

“In the Sweetness of Friendship,
let there be Laughter
and the Sharing of Pleasures ”
Khalil Gibran
Barbara Ann Kenonilani Moore
President of Big Island Health and Wellness Alliance
soul proprietor of Dragonfly Ranch: HEALING ARTS CENTER
Voted #1 B&B in West Hawaii by readers of West Hawaii Today daily paper
(808)328-2159
http://dragonflyranch.com
where Aloha abounds
72 degrees and sunny on Big Island’s Kona Coast

The Future of Farming

Published in The Kohala Mountain News, Story and photo by Dr. Frederick Kennedy

Dr. Jana Bogs and Sustainable Kohala will host an evening presentation on February 13 to discuss a fundamental paradigm shift in farming and gardening–to a focus on growing more “nutrient rich” foods.

Bogs will describe the history which explains how the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables has suffered dramatic losses over the past 60 years due to the influence of big agribusiness. She will show how nutrient density can be regained.

Due to the ‘unsustainable’ practices of agribusiness farming, the nutritional value of fruits, vegetables is much lower than it was early last century. USDA documentation and several scientific studies prove this claim.

Nutrient testing of produce reveals that, in some cases, organic produce has a higher nutritional value. However, this is not a consistent finding, and, unfortunately, sometimes organics have lower nutrient levels than conventional. An apple can be perfect by organic standards (no bug or weed killers) and yet be significantly lower in nutritional value than a conventionally-grown apple. Soil mineral balance is a critical factor which is often overlooked.

Bogs explains, “In the 1970’s, as some people became aware of what big agribusiness was doing to our fundamental sources of nutrition, our fruits, vegetables and grains, the need arose to distinguish healthy food from plants that were grown expressly for profit margin. That need was filled by establishing standards and practices that would assure food buyers they were not getting pesticides, herbicides, chemicals (such as left-over bomb materials) and, later, genetically modified organisms in their food. It was a new movement and direction in farming and gardening, and it was called “organic.”

Today’s organic standards and practices tell the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, in order to earn the label “organically certified.” The standards and practices are ‘restrictive’ rather than ‘prescriptive.’

Bogs will explain how a new paradigm in gardening and farming is going “beyond organic” to “nutrient rich” standards and practices. This is a perspective that, while it meets and exceeds organic standards, it is prescriptive rather than merely restrictive. It looks to see what is needed to optimize the genetic potential of the plant. Rather than telling the farmer/gardener what he/she cannot do, it prescribes for them what they need to do to grow the very best quality food.

Bogs defines “best” for the consumer as the best tasting, the highest nutritional value, the most appealing and beautiful; for the merchant as the longest shelf-life and the most desirable product; for the grower as the highest yield, the lowest insect pressure and the most disease resistant; and for the environment as practices which ensure clean air, water and soil.

The February 13 presentation will take place at 7 p.m. at the Kohala Intergenerational Center (KIC) located behind the Hisaoka Gym in Kamehameha Park. The event is free and open to the public. Dr. Jana Bogs is a nutritionist, food scientist, and horticulturist.