Organic industry keeps on rolling–Zintro article with Dr. Jana Bogs

Organic industry keeps on rolling
Posted on June 2, 2011 by zintro
By Maureen Aylward
The New York Times reports that with the global recession, organic farming and the organic industry is holding steady and growing. We asked our Zintro experts to comment on some reasons for this growth, especially in these tough economic times.

Carlos AgNet, an organics consultant who works in government regulation, says that supply is decades behind demand in the organics industry due to cost and complexity hurdles. “Besides consumer education driving demand, the future of farm regulation will create a more level playing field for certified organic operators,” he says. “With all producers being required to get a Food Safety or GAP certification in the near future, the regulatory cost difference between conventional and organic producers will narrow.”

Mashood Ahmed, and agro-ecologist and food safety and security expert, says that organic products are gaining market share due to a variety of reasons, such as farmer independence, better cultivation practices that allow the farmer to control input costs, and understanding the role of nature. “I have seen many farms becoming less mechanized and reverting back to the conventional plowing and harvesting techniques,” says Ahmed. “This means jobs, and I believe these shifts will keep economies moving in a balanced and rational way.”

Mayte de Groot, a specialist in the Mexican organics market, says that demand is growing faster than production. “The leaders in this space are the European countries (Germany, Switzerland, Norway, Denmark, Holland, and Belgium) in production and consumption,” she says. “But many more consumers around the world are slowly shifting consumer habits due to ecological consciousness. Organic distributors and importers in Europe need new supplies because they claim there is not enough variety of organic products available in the market for industry and retail consumption.”

de Groot says that market researchers find it difficult to get figures about organic consumption because there is no official statistical data regarding organic yield production, trade, or consumption worldwide. “In Mexico, even though there are no official statistics about organic product consumption, Mexican companies in this sector are reporting sales increases over 20 percent each year,” she says. “This means greater business for supermarkets, distributors, importers, and farmers and more variety and choices.”

Dr. Jana Bogs thinks that the organic industry is growing because of the passion behind it. “People in the organic industry are on a passionate mission to make the world a better place. Organic farmers feel good about what they grow; organic product companies feel good about what they produce; and consumers feel good about using these products. A lot of people are aware and concerned about the planet, so buying organic is helping them do something good for our environment,” she says.

“Scientific studies prove that children who are fed organic food have significantly fewer toxic chemicals in their blood. As cancer rates rise, consumers look for ways to decrease their personal toxic loads. The extra cost for organics is justified, and we are seeing consumers voting for organics with their pocketbooks.”

What is needed to bring the Nutraceutical industry to the next level? What areas are seeing growth?

What is needed is something new…the nutraceutical industry, like many industries, relies on having new, different, better products—“new-traceuticals”! Consumers prefer herbal- and food-based products for their broad-spectrum of nutrients, especially if they are organically grown. Organic is more than well established, it’s hot! It’s not “going away”, but it’s not new either. So, what’s the next step? “Beyond Organic”!

Some successful companies are already using the term “Beyond Organic”, but what does it mean? Organic production is a system of growing foods which focuses on adding organic matter (carbonaceous materials) to the soil, while abstaining from manufactured chemicals. So “Beyond Organic” must mean something more. I use the term to refer to a method of food production which maximizes nutrient density by carefully analyzing the soil and then balancing it with the full spectrum of needed minerals. The plants resulting from this system test higher in nutrients. I call this process “Going Beyond Organic to Nutrient-Rich”. It’s all about helping the plants to express their genetic potentials, so that consumers can, in turn, express their genetic potentials. Look out for this next BIG wave in the nutraceutical industry!

Dr. Jana Bogs

Organic–it’s not just a label on good products–it’s a mission!

People in the organic industry are on a passionate mission to make the world a better place. It’s not a profession one enters just for the money–it’s about doing things right. Organic farmers feel good about what they grow, organic product companies feel good about what they produce, and consumers feel good about using these products. A lot of people are aware and concerned about the planet, so buying organic is helping them do something.

Besides feeling good emotionally, organic products help people feel good physically because they contain fewer toxic chemicals. That starts in the field with the farmer not having to “suit up” with a full body suit and a gas mask to spray toxic chemicals. Farming can be fun again! Scientific studies prove that children fed organic food have significantly fewer toxic chemicals in their blood. As cancer rates rise, consumers look for ways to decrease their personal toxic loads. The extra cost is absolutely justified, and the buying public votes “organic” with their dollars.

Other scientific studies show increased levels of antioxidants in organically-grown foods. Again, this appeals to the health conscious consumers. This quest for greater nutrient density is being answered by researchers such as myself who are moving “beyond (just) organic” to nutrient enhancement of food crops. This is accomplished through careful testing of soil and plants, and then supplying the plants with optimal nutrition so they can express their potentials. These nutrient-rich plants, in turn, supply us with outstanding quality food. Nutritionally-enhanced vegetables can have up to 10 times the mineral content of typical produce. This naturally-enhanced “beyond organic” food is the next big wave in the organic industry!

Article on “What’s Next for the Organic Industry”

What’s next for the organic industry in the US organic food and organic product areas? What are the challenges to future growth?      Posted on April 1, 2011 by zintro

In 2009, total US organic sales for food and non-food products were $26.6 billion and growing. With mass market retailers increasing their offerings of organics, where might the industry be headed?

The US organic products industry has seen strong growth over the years and should expect to see continued growth, says Peter Leighton, an expert and recognized leader in the areas of consumer products, nutraceuticals, and human nutrition. “In spite of weak economic conditions, the category remains vibrant,” he explains. “There are a host of drivers that fuel this growth, but the critical component is the acceleration of scale. As demand increases for organic products, more organic inputs are allocated, thereby reducing the endpoint costs for consumers.” This, in turn, fuels greater growth.

Environmental issues are increasingly playing a strong role in that growth, notes Leighton. “More data is demonstrating the value of sustainable agricultural practices and the health and environmental benefits of natural pesticides,” he says. While to date one of the greatest consumer triggers for organic products has been the health halo of the products, increasingly the industry will see environmental and ecological triggers driving consumer action, as these have a much more significant point of differentiation.

Carlos-AgNet, an expert in organic product lines and a consultant to organic companies and certification groups, says that the saving grace for the organics industry is a decade’s old demand that has seen supply increases. “This demand is providing unprecedented opportunity for those that can develop a retail organic product,” says Carlos-AgNet. “The industry has recently seen an explosion of beverages and beauty products.”

One of the challenges that Carlos-AgNet sees for the organics industry is the certification process. “Basic standards for organic certification receive a wide interpretation within the national standard and between countries, which inhibits trade in international products, such as food and textiles,” he says. New product areas in the organics industry bring with them a new generation of standards that are difficult for producers to sort out. Instead, cosmetic and food manufacturers are choosing voluntary or non-organic standards, such as natural, to avoid having to go through the national organic standards.

“The US market is decades behind Europe in organics and agriculture transformation,” says Carlos-AgNet. “A real threat to US producers could be the replacement of US producers of agricultural products with those from more advanced agricultural economies.” He states that this shift may not affect the US organic retail market.

Dr. Jana Bogs is looking beyond organics to the next step the industry might take to increase nutrition in organic fruits and vegetables and natural ingredients. Bogs is an expert in food science, horticulture, nutrition, and agriculture.

“Several scientific studies have shown significant decreases in nutrient density in fruits and vegetables over the past half century,” Bogs says. “There is a lot more research to be done, but we currently have enough knowledge to produce significantly higher quality produce at the current time. Some producers understand how to grow beyond-organic foods, but they need a better marketing system.” She adds that food and nutrition supplement companies who are looking to capture a larger percentage of the market would do well to look into these optimally-grown foods.

Going “Beyond Organic” with Dr. Jana Bogs, your crop consultant on the Big Island of Hawaii

Organic Tomatoes , North Kohala, Hawaii

I’m Working on Growing the Healthiest Food Ever here in North Kohala.

As a consultant, I can help you and your garden create–

  • Consistent, Abundant Yields
  • Outstanding Flavor & Texture
  • Optimal, Consistent Fruit Size
  • Greatly Increased Shelf Life
  • Maximum Nutrient Density
  • Enhanced Pest and Disease Resistance

The Soil and Plant Doctor

Jana Bogs, DN, MS, PhD

(808) 938-9888

Riding the Next Wave in the Nutrition Marketplace

Every nutritional products company needs truly innovative products that make real differences in people’s lives. Nutrient-Rich Foods are what will take nutrition to the next level for improving human health and longevity.

Agricultural practices have resulted in a decrease of nutrient density in foods. There has also been a concomitant increase in toxic chemical content, not only from agricultural chemicals, but also from poor plant metabolism which may result in harmful constituents such as mycotoxins. As a clinical nutritionist I became keenly aware of these problems. This ignited my passion to “create health from the soil up”. To accomplish this I delved into how soil science, horticulture, and food science affect human and animal nutrition. I am well educated in and out of universities. I was spurred to get a PhD in Horticulture and Food Science & Safety to become a research scientist and consultant. I explore the cutting edge of what is possible in nutrition, for example, examining the differences in blood glucose response from fruits grown under varying cultivation systems. Optimal cultivation systems produce healthy plants which produce healthy humans and animals.

I focus on techniques which help plants to fully express their genetic capacity. Careful growing practices which allow for full genetic expression may result in production of plant tissue compounds with extraordinary human health benefits. I term this “Going Beyond Organic to Nutrient-Rich”. Nutrients which are “life-complexed” by plants may be better utilized at the cellular level. For example, mined calcium products may contribute to calcification of soft tissue—aging(!), whereas calcium complexed through plant metabolism may be properly utilized by the body. Furthermore, a larger percentage of the nutrients in plants grown in optimally-balanced soil versus poorly-balanced soil may be incorporated into body tissue as opposed to being excreted.

Beyond the resulting full-spectrum, balanced nutrition, additional benefits include improved flavor and greatly extended shelf life. With proper growing techniques, plant pest and disease pressure are naturally decreased without the use of toxic chemicals, which then results in a cleaner environment. So it is truly a win-win-win-win situation for all concerned—the food producer, the marketer, the consumer and the environment. I believe it is possible for our world to sustainably produce high quality food which supports all life physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

With the advent of the continually growing market awareness of the value of organic nutritional products, the time has come for the next step—“Beyond Organic” foods and supplements. Some farmers understand how to grow “Beyond Organic” foods, but they need a better marketing system. I will enjoy working to procure these authentic “Beyond Organic” ingredients and, together with a team, perform analytical and clinical trials to further establish their efficacy. We will then use these superior ingredients to create supreme quality, nutrient-rich products with which we will create the next wave in the nutrition world marketplace. My broad background in agriculture and nutrition, including sales, marketing, clinical work, and R&D have given me the expertise and connections to make this happen. I still need a great team and funding to make it happen. If you, or some people you know, are interested in being part of this exciting ride, I look forward to speaking with you on how we may work together.

Aloha,

Jana Bogs, PhD